The Nooner for Monday, December 2, presented by SYASL Partners

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PODS (full list coming back soon!):

  • SacTown Talks by The Nooner (Gibran Maciel and Scott Lay): What a Week with guest fmr Assemblyman Mike Gatto on his homelessness initiative. (2019-11-29) [YouTube | iTunes | Simplecast]
  • SacTown Talks by The Nooner (Gibran Maciel and Scott Lay): Noel Kammermann, executive director of Loaves and Fishes (2019-11-26) [YouTube | iTunes | Simplecast]

IN TODAY’S NOONER:

  • Live pod – SCOTUS is heating up just in time – big gun case today
  • Deadlines
  • The OC House races – Dems on defense
  • John Cox tries to flip House seats
  • Family feud
  • Law and disorder
  • Budget bonanza
  • UC: let there be spite
  • SacTown – SuperShuttle suspends service
  • LA-LA Land – bring the shade
  • Cakeday and Classifieds

Happy Monday! Thank you for the feedback on what format I should use for The Nooner. Of course, it’s almost split exactly of proponents of each. I’ll think about whether there is a possible hybrid to meet what the most people are looking for.

One week from tonight is our live podcast from Capital Books with UC Davis constitutional law professor Carlton F.W. Larson, who is the author of the new book The Trials of Allegiance: Treason, Juries, and the American Revolution.

I’ve been spending time with the book and while reading about the Revolution it’s eerily on topic in today’s America. It’s really fascinating such as there weren’t really “two sides” of those loyal to the Crown and those wanting to break free therefrom. Allegations of “treason” was levied not only between those sides. but also among those of the nascent country.

When we booked Professor Larson, we had no idea where we would be in the impeachment proceedings, if there were any. Well, on Wednesday, the first formal hearings begin in House Judiciary and they are fully expected to continue next week. Next week, Judiciary will likely be provided the report of the House Intelligence Committee from chair Adam Schiff (D-Burbank).

That itself may suck up most of the podcast time including with an audience Q&A, but we’ll also be ready to talk about other issues, such the gun cases making their way to the Supreme Court, including ones from California on large-capacity magazine bans and limitations on open carry.

This morning, the Supreme Court is hearing a case that might rewrite its current Second Amendment gun doctrine, known for the Heller (2008) and McDonald (2010) cases. In New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. City of New York, New York, the Court will look at whether the city’s ban on transporting a licensed, locked and unloaded handgun to a home or shooting range outside city limits is consistent with the Second Amendment, the commerce clause and the constitutional right to travel.

Heller (District of Columbia) and McDonald (Chicago) held that the Second Amendment creates a right to regulated gun ownership within the home for defense of self and property, but the doctrine from the cases is quite limited. Since then, several states including California and localities have tested the jurisprudence with more restrict laws but SCOTUS has been reluctant to reopen the issue, even though the four votes needed to grant review likely were there.

Many observers believe that Chief Justice didn’t want to be seen as shaking things up too much on many social issues, including guns and abortion. After fourteen years in the role, he seems more willing to allow such cases to proceed in what will likely be a definitional period for the Roberts Court (a good conversation for next week’s pod in itself).

New York City won in both the district court and in the Second Circuit. A decision in the case is expected by the end of the Court’s term in June 2020.

Grab your free ticket for next Monday at 7pm at Capital Books next door to the Crest Theatre on K Street in Sacramento. We are grateful for the support of Bell McAndrews HiltackChurchwell White, and Perry Communications Group, who are making equipment purchases and refreshments possible. We can use a few more to make the evening happen. Sponsors will be recognized with signage at the event, mentions on the podcast, and a one month 120×90 graphical ad in The Nooner.

We would love to see you there and have you be a part of our first live podcast recording!

News after the jump…

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DEADLINES: Friday is the deadline for filing for California’s March 3 ballot. For districts in which an eligible incumbent does not file, the deadline is extended to next Wednesday, December 11. As of now, these races will have the extended deadline:

  • CA08 (San Bern. High Desert) – Paul Cook (R)
  • CA25 (Santa Clarita-Palmdale) – Katie Hill (D)  – regular (special deadline is January 9)
  • CA53 (San Diego) – Susan Davis (D)
  • SD28 (Temecula-Blythe) – Jeff Stone (R) – special deadline is January 9; not up for regular in 2020
  • AD25 (Hayward-Santa Clara) – Kansen Chu (D) running for BOS
  • AD37 (Santa Barbara) – Monique Limón (D) running for SD19
  • AD57 (Whittier) – Ian C. Calderon (D)
  • AD67 (Lake Elsinore) – Melissa Melendez (R) running for SD28 special

The filing is not extended for offices left open because the incumbent is term-limited, such as in SD13 (Hill), SD15 (Beall), SD17 (Monning), SD19 (Jackson).

THE OC: For the Chron, Joe Garofoli writes that flipping four congressional seats in Orange County in 2018 was key to Democrats reclaiming the House but now the party must defend them in a less-certain political environment.

COX: Meanwhile, 2018 GOP gubernatorial candidate John Cox has a different focus in 2020, reports Peter Rowe in the San Diego Union Tribune. The wealthy real estate businessman is focusing on flipping back the seven House seats to the Republican ledger by focusing on persuading and turning out independent voters. Rowe writes:

This spring, Cox founded C.H.A.N.G.E. CA, or “Californians for Honest and Non-partisan Government Effectiveness,” pledging $1 million of his own fortune to this cause. He plans to send canvassers — “C.H.A.N.G.E. Agents” — door to door in seven congressional districts that were captured by the Democratic candidates in 2018 after years of being held by Republicans.

The canvassers will talk to independent voters about the state’s problems and proposed solutions. C.H.A.N.G.E.’s web site and printed materials don’t detail the latter, but Cox argues that the state needs less regulation — he’s especially critical of CEQA, the California Environmental Quality Act, which he believes hamstrings development — and that statewide policies have been dictated by unions, trial lawyers and the Democratic party.

FAMILY FEUD: For the LAT, Taryn Luna reports on the continued tension between the State Building and Construction Trades and Governor Gavin Newsom. Luna writes:

As the end of his first year in office nears, the governor has found himself on the wrong side of one of the most formidable factions of organized labor at the Capitol in a fight that could threaten his agenda to address the state’s housing crisis and test the trades’ political muscle in Sacramento. The 450,000-member union is a major Democratic donor and one of the most influential players on housing issues in the state.

Tensions brewed for nearly a year, fueled by what the union says were actions by the governor that ran counter to the interests of its members, including vetoing bills they supported. But some in the labor movement say it comes as no surprise that the trades — known for commanding respect and pulling no punches with officials — are the first among them to publicly quarrel with Newsom, a governor who has championed a variety of causes backed by unions over the last 11 months.

LAW AND DISORDER: Patrick McGreevy reports for the LAT that car burglaries in many communities continue to be at historically high levels but the Legislature has been reluctant to address a loophole that leaves many such acts unpunished. Specifically, prosecution can often rest on whether or not it can be proven that the car’s doors were locked at the time of the break-in.

McGreevy reports:

“It’s ridiculous that under current law you can have a video of someone bashing out a car window, but if you can’t prove that the door is locked you may not be able to get an auto burglary conviction,” said state Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), who introduced the legislation at the request of the San Francisco district attorney’s office.

This year’s bill, SB 23 (Wiener), passed the State Senate 34-1 and Assembly Public Safety 6-0 but was killed in Assembly Appropriations on the Suspense File on August 30.

BUDGET BONANZA: With a budget surplus projected by the Legislative Analyst’s Office of as much as $7 billion in the 2020-21 fiscal year and as the Department of Finance develops the Governor’s January budget proposal, Dan Walters looks at the pressures by constituencies to increase spending, specifically schools.

Several large urban districts are flirting with insolvency and politically powerful education groups, especially unions, are looking to Sacramento for relief.

Schools are due for a $3.4 billion increase in revenue next year under the state’s constitutional guarantee, but [LAO Gabriel] Petek says their costs are rising faster than income.

Pension costs alone are expected to rise by $1 billion next year, due to legislation aimed at erasing a deficit in the California State Teachers Retirement System and mandatory payments by the California Public Employees Retirement System for cafeteria workers, clerical staff and other non-classroom personnel.

One discussion I’m hearing is using the money to get the education backers to abandon the split roll measure to assess commercial properties at fair market value for Proposition 13 purposes perhaps combined with a more muted ballot measure that doesn’t have the same huge opposition from the business community. However, the challenge is whether the non-education community-based organizations that have been strong backers could somehow be left happy with a compromise.

UC: LET THERE BE SPITE: In the LAT, Margot Roosevelt reports on the ongoing conflict between the University of California and AFSCME over contracting out. Roosevelt writes:

The University of California is at war with its largest union, the 26,000-member Local 3299 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME). November’s one-day strike, with picket lines at 10 UC campuses and five university hospitals across the state, was the sixth such angry walkout in the three years that the two sides have been fighting over a new contract.

The issue is outsourcing: the sprawling university system’s use of workers from temporary help agencies and staffing firms to fill low- and middle-wage service and healthcare jobs.

UC, the state’s third-largest employer, spends some $523 million a year on outside contracts for an estimated 10,000 parking attendants, security guards, custodians, cafeteria workers, groundskeepers and patient-care technicians among dozens of occupations normally represented by Local 3299.

Stop the Clippers Arena

SACTOWN: Today, SuperShuttle has suspended its service to/from the Sacramento Intergalactic Airport, which could be because of noncompliant insurance, low ridership, or both. Obviously, shifts in transportation options has to be a major factor.

LA-LA LAND: In the NYT, Tim Arango reports that “shade is increasingly seen as a precious commodity, as the crises of climate change and inequality converge.” Arango continues:

Using data that overlays areas of intense heat with the busiest public transit routes, the city is rushing to deploy shade to nearly 750 bus stops, using trees, shade sails or umbrellas. In addition, the city has recently hired its first forestry officer, and announced a goal of planting 90,000 shade trees by 2021. As part of this effort, some of the city’s famous palm trees, which have defined the image of the city but do not provide much shade, could be replaced.

CAKEDAY:  Happy birthday to Christopher Bowen and Robert Garcia!
calstatela-201910

Classifieds

Add your classified now both in The Nooner and online
for $50/week or $150/month by emailing
scottlay@gmail.com, with a headline, a summary of up to 200 words, and what you’d like the end date to be. You can attach a PDF or provide a link for a bigger job description/info to apply. [Other advertising options]

 

PREMIER OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
Four new construction offices available for immediate sublease, located in a Class A office building, one block from the capitol building. Two window units and two interior units, available individually or as a group. Access to two conference rooms with seating up to 25. For price and availability, please call 916-217-2616.
Finance Director/Call Time Manager
Manage fundraising operations, including call time for leading Democratic candidate in competitive open Assembly District race. Reports to campaign manager. Must have direct fundraising experience with campaign or non-profit fundraising, ability to manage call time, donor acknowledgement, work with finance committee and major donors, and events. Attention to detail a must. Send resume & at least 2 professional references to MR@MaryRoseAssociates.com – with Finance Director in subject line.
Campaign Coordinator
Manage day-to-day campaign operations for competitive open Assembly District race for leading Democratic candidate; reports to campaign manager. Experience in field, volunteer recruitment, fundraising, campaign management or the equivalent. Knowledge/experience in Santa Barbara and/or Ventura County helpful. Send resume & at least 2 professional references to MR@MaryRoseAssociates.com – with Campaign Coordinator in subject line.
So you think you want to sponsor a bill?
For the first time, Capitol Seminars will be offering an immersive session addressing the entire range of activity involved in sponsoring legislation: from the process involved in making the decision to seek a legislative solution all the way through post-enactment necessities.“So you think you want to sponsor a bill?” is a unique seminar opportunity presented by a roster of distinguished guest faculty each of whom is expert in a specialized particular part of this deeply immersive curriculum.For further information or to register for this December 12 seminar, please email us at judco12000@yahoo.com or call us at 916 442-5009.
Capitol Seminars December 2019 Sessions
One of the MOST IMPORTANT DATES on a lobbyist’s calendar is the day the Legislature reconvenes; in the present case January 6, 2020.Because each step of the legislative process can be “make or break”, Capitol Seminars offers our final sessions of the year in December to address the complexities of a bill’s journey with specific focus on helping you prepare for the unknown moving forward, finish and optimize unfinished business, and analyze and learn from what has already occurred.Our December 5-6 sessions conducted by 44-year Capitol veteran Ray LeBov, have already reached 75% capacity.If this MOST IMPORTANT DATE resonates with you, REGISTER HERE or call Ray with questions (916) 442-5009.
SEIU-UHW – Government Relations Advocate/Organizer (Sacramento, CA)
The Government Relations Organizer in the Political Department reports to the Assistant Director for Government Relations and is responsible for a broad range of program objectives to advance SEIU-UHW’s strategic goals through legislative advocacy, coalition building, and regulatory advocacy.SEIU-UHW offers a competitive salary, commensurate with experience, and a generous benefit package. For more information on the position and to apply please visit our candidate portal at seiuunitedhealthcareworkers.appone.com
Account Supervisor/Director (Los Angeles) – Fiona Hutton and Associates
Fiona Hutton & Associates is looking for a highly-driven communications pro to join our Los Angeles-based agency as an Account Supervisor or Director (depending on experience).The position requires a minimum 5-7 years of experience in public affairs, public relations or politics, with agency experience required. Responsible for managing integrated communications and advocacy programs, creative content, media relations & coalitions. Will oversee operational performance of accounts, serve as day-to-day contact with clients and mentor junior staff.For full qualifications and responsibilities, read the job description at www.fionahuttonassoc.com/careers/account-supervisor-director/.Interested candidates should submit a cover letter and resume to resume@fionahuttonassoc.com.
The McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific
The McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, offers the Master of Public Administration (MPA) and the Master of Public Policy (MPP) degrees to both full-time students and those earning a professional degree while working. Our focus on the interconnections of law, policy, management, and leadership provides unique competencies for your success. Students gain a foundation in statutory interpretation and regulatory processes critical to governance. Learn at a beautiful campus three miles from the State Capitol: go.mcgeorge.edu/publicpolicy or publicpolicy@pacific.edu.
Political Data Inc.
For 30 Years PDI has been California’s premier data vendor. Now, you can get live online trainings on the newest PDI software every week:

The Nooner for Sunday, December 1, presented by SYASL Partners

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PODS (full list coming back soon!):

  • SacTown Talks by The Nooner (Gibran Maciel and Scott Lay): What a Week with guest fmr Assemblyman Mike Gatto on his homelessness initiative. (2019-11-29) [YouTube | iTunes | Simplecast]
  • SacTown Talks by The Nooner (Gibran Maciel and Scott Lay): Noel Kammermann, executive director of Loaves and Fishes (2019-11-26) [YouTube | iTunes | Simplecast]

IN TODAY’S NOONER:

  • The GOP
  • Cameras in the courtroom
  • CA53 (San Diego)
  • Bay Area drug deaths
  • Cakeday and Classifieds

Happy Sunday and happy December! It’s cold, wet, and windy in SacTown. As usual, the ghost of Chuck Todd was like a puppy with a wet nose getting me out of bed before Meet the Press. It was nice to see former governor Arnold Schwarzenegger on the show with John Kerry to talk about climate issues and Kerry’s World War Zero effort.

It’s a great segment and I strongly suggest watching it regardless how you felt as Arnold left office on January 3, 2011. “In Bakersfield now, there are more solar jobs than oil ones.” (Don’t have time to fact check that, but it’s certainly the case in industry job growth.)

Chuck should have had the two on for the entire hour and we could have skipped a presidential candidate today.

Of course, I was happy for the Chuckish early awakening on a day that bed and a comforted sounded far better, as I need to type these words out before the possible preview of Super Bowl LIV in Miami and a rematch of Super Bowl XLVII in 2013.

Adding this just before I need to send out words that you may not read today–what a flippin’ game!

While we can debate the math of whether or not this is the first day of the last month of the decade (it is not), there is no denying that it is World AIDS Day. The day used to be a huge thing in the United States drawing celebrity concerts and universal red ribbons. Fortunately it is less so domestically now because of advances in medicine and I’m thankful as it’s touched my own family as it likely has many of yours.

That said, with all this anti-billionaire talk from the Democratic presidential field, it must be noted today that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation continues to lead on the issue of HIV in the developing world where it is as deadly as ever. I’m guessing they have done more with the wealth generated than would have happened had it passed through Washington.

After all, I think we know about the politics of foreign assistance based on current political drama that returns with hearings starting again on Wednesday…

 

Stop the Clippers Arena

THE GOP: For CalMatters, Dan Walters writes another article about the decline of the state’s GOP. Yes, we’ve seen about twenty-five such pieces over the last month because of the 25th anniversary of Prop. 187. I almost didn’t link to this one, yet he makes this important point:

[D]iscontent is fueling the emergence of Democratic subfactions which duel for dominance, leaving the GOP irrelevant for at least the foreseeable future.

The point is that it affects both the Republican and Democratic parties.

CAMERAS IN THE COURTROOM: As much of a legal fanboy as I am, I did not know that the Supreme Court of California and Ninth Circuit provide video of arguments until I read this Bob Egelko article in the Chron this morning! The point of the article is that the Supreme Court of the United States maintains its long objection from doing such.

I’m looking forward to watching the SCOCAL oral argument in the Trump tax returns case just to feel really bad for the state’s attorneys arguing for a law that was patently wrong under both the federal and state constitutions. From my conversations with legislators that are off the record, most knew it was unconstitutional and said “We’ll leave it to the courts.”

And that they did. In this case twisting an oft-used phrase “The Legislature/Governor proposes, and the court disposes.”

CA53 (San Diego): I missed this great story by Joaquin Romero in Capitol Weekly earlier this week amidst the server chaos, but it’s a great profile of the progressive candidate to succeed retiring House Democrat Susan Davis.–who was in the race before it became a crowded field after Davis announced her retirement. Romero writes:

Jose Caballero, a military veteran, Bernie Sanders supporter and political consultant who describes himself as a progressive Democrat, is running for the seat. Davis said that her decision was driven by a desire to “live and work ‘at home’” in San Diego, although Caballero contends that her retirement came as a result of intensifying pressure from her primary challengers and from unhappy constituents. Caballero had announced his intention to run before Davis’s announcement.

 

A crowd of other candidates also want the job, including the presumptive front runner, San Diego City Council President Georgette Gomez, and Sara Jacobs, a former aide to Hillary Clinton and a scholar in residence at the University of San Diego.

 

But Caballero deserves a look and his story is unusual.

 

 

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BAY AREA DRUG DEATHS: For the Chron, Erin Allday and Kevin Fagan report that drug overdose deaths in the Bay Area have surpassed 10,000, but it’s not predominantly the high-profile prescription drugs. It’s meth and, increasingly, synthetic fentanyl.

A couple of weeks ago, we had our Open California/Capitol Weekly board of directors meeting and we were talking about the conference plans for 2020. As we were talking mental health and addiction, a couple of folks who follow the issues more closely than I do spoke about just the above.

Most of the conversations about the “opioid crisis” often go to Oxycontin, because it’s a brand name and there’s the big bad evil Purdue Pharma and Sackler family. It’s also expensive and largely consumed by those who can afford it.

That is, until they no longer can afford it and look for cheaper heroin or, increasingly, synthetic fentanyl.

It’s no secret that I’ve been through rehab–twice. For me, it was only ever alcohol. Since legalization, I’ve had cannabis edibles to help with sleep and I’ve never had any interest in any other drug nor desire for a cannabis “high.” (This is heresy to say for absolutists in recovery, but I’m a Buddhist and can do my lifetime of recovery in the manner that works for me. Namu Amida Butsu.)

All that to say that I had dear friends in recovery who followed exactly that path of starting with things like Oxy and ending up with whatever the cheapest possible high/low was and it often was meth or heroin, even if they were different mind-altering effects. There’s a stereotype about meth addicts that we know from movies or television but the fact is that it’s far more prevalent “off the streets” than we like to admit.

And, like the Chron story reports, people are dying. Any given bad “trip” is a sad and quick stairway to heaven.

CAKEDAY:  Happy birthday to Logan Kemp and Markos Kounalakis!
calstatela-201910

Classifieds

Add your classified now both in The Nooner and online
for $50/week or $150/month by emailing
scottlay@gmail.com, with a headline, a summary of up to 200 words, and what you’d like the end date to be. You can attach a PDF or provide a link for a bigger job description/info to apply. [Other advertising options]

 

PREMIER OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
Four new construction offices available for immediate sublease, located in a Class A office building, one block from the capitol building. Two window units and two interior units, available individually or as a group. Access to two conference rooms with seating up to 25. For price and availability, please call 916-217-2616.
Finance Director/Call Time Manager
Manage fundraising operations, including call time for leading Democratic candidate in competitive open Assembly District race. Reports to campaign manager. Must have direct fundraising experience with campaign or non-profit fundraising, ability to manage call time, donor acknowledgement, work with finance committee and major donors, and events. Attention to detail a must. Send resume & at least 2 professional references to MR@MaryRoseAssociates.com – with Finance Director in subject line.
Campaign Coordinator
Manage day-to-day campaign operations for competitive open Assembly District race for leading Democratic candidate; reports to campaign manager. Experience in field, volunteer recruitment, fundraising, campaign management or the equivalent. Knowledge/experience in Santa Barbara and/or Ventura County helpful. Send resume & at least 2 professional references to MR@MaryRoseAssociates.com – with Campaign Coordinator in subject line.
So you think you want to sponsor a bill?
For the first time, Capitol Seminars will be offering an immersive session addressing the entire range of activity involved in sponsoring legislation: from the process involved in making the decision to seek a legislative solution all the way through post-enactment necessities.“So you think you want to sponsor a bill?” is a unique seminar opportunity presented by a roster of distinguished guest faculty each of whom is expert in a specialized particular part of this deeply immersive curriculum.For further information or to register for this December 12 seminar, please email us at judco12000@yahoo.com or call us at 916 442-5009.
Capitol Seminars December 2019 Sessions
One of the MOST IMPORTANT DATES on a lobbyist’s calendar is the day the Legislature reconvenes; in the present case January 6, 2020.Because each step of the legislative process can be “make or break”, Capitol Seminars offers our final sessions of the year in December to address the complexities of a bill’s journey with specific focus on helping you prepare for the unknown moving forward, finish and optimize unfinished business, and analyze and learn from what has already occurred.Our December 5-6 sessions conducted by 44-year Capitol veteran Ray LeBov, have already reached 75% capacity.If this MOST IMPORTANT DATE resonates with you, REGISTER HERE or call Ray with questions (916) 442-5009.
SEIU-UHW – Government Relations Advocate/Organizer (Sacramento, CA)
The Government Relations Organizer in the Political Department reports to the Assistant Director for Government Relations and is responsible for a broad range of program objectives to advance SEIU-UHW’s strategic goals through legislative advocacy, coalition building, and regulatory advocacy.SEIU-UHW offers a competitive salary, commensurate with experience, and a generous benefit package. For more information on the position and to apply please visit our candidate portal at seiuunitedhealthcareworkers.appone.com
Account Supervisor/Director (Los Angeles) – Fiona Hutton and Associates
Fiona Hutton & Associates is looking for a highly-driven communications pro to join our Los Angeles-based agency as an Account Supervisor or Director (depending on experience).The position requires a minimum 5-7 years of experience in public affairs, public relations or politics, with agency experience required. Responsible for managing integrated communications and advocacy programs, creative content, media relations & coalitions. Will oversee operational performance of accounts, serve as day-to-day contact with clients and mentor junior staff.For full qualifications and responsibilities, read the job description at www.fionahuttonassoc.com/careers/account-supervisor-director/.Interested candidates should submit a cover letter and resume to resume@fionahuttonassoc.com.
The McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific
The McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, offers the Master of Public Administration (MPA) and the Master of Public Policy (MPP) degrees to both full-time students and those earning a professional degree while working. Our focus on the interconnections of law, policy, management, and leadership provides unique competencies for your success. Students gain a foundation in statutory interpretation and regulatory processes critical to governance. Learn at a beautiful campus three miles from the State Capitol: go.mcgeorge.edu/publicpolicy or publicpolicy@pacific.edu.
Political Data Inc.
For 30 Years PDI has been California’s premier data vendor. Now, you can get live online trainings on the newest PDI software every week:

The Nooner for Friday, November 29, presented by SYASL Partners

mrc-300x250-GIF_Nooner

NEW POD: SacTown Talks by The Nooner (Gibran Maciel and Scott Lay): Noel Kammermann, executive director of Loaves and Fishes (2019-11-26) [YouTube | iTunes | Simplecast]

IN TODAY’S NOONER:

  • AD57 (Whittier)
  • AD73 (Dana Point)
  • PG&E
  • Fire relief
  • Water
  • Kamala
  • Motor voter
  • Vaping
  • Cox
  • AIDS Healthcare Foundation
  • Muni matters
  • Cakeday, Farewell, and Classifieds

Happy frosty Friday! I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving and survived the retail stampede if that’s your thing.

AD57 (Whittier): On the first day of filing Wednesday after Assembly Majority Leader Ian C. Calderon (D-Whittier) announced he would not seek re-election in 2020, three Democrats pulled papers:

  • Josué Alvarado, Whittier City Council
  • Henry Renan Bouchot, Whittier City Council
  • Justin Joshua Valero, CSUSB professor (ran in 2018, placed fourth in top-two)

Louis Reyes is staying in the race for Whittier mayor, where he wants to be the first Latino elected to that role and, like the retiring Calderon, has young children.

Expected to pull papers as early as today is Hacienda La Puente USD board member Martin Medrano, who also district director for Congressman Gil Cisneros (D-Yorba Linda). He lives in Hacienda Heights and has to be happy to see two Whittier councilmembers considering the race. Whittier is the biggest city in the district.

Two others have pulled papers — Green Party candidate Fernando Landeros and Republican Jessica Martinez. Although a safe Democratic district, the race is likely to be essentially decided in March with the prevailing Democrat advancing with the Republican.

AD73 (Dana Point): Just in case you were wondering, Assemblyman Bill Brough has completed his filing for re-election, despite allegations of sexual harassment. Brough has denied the allegations, which were brought forward by Lisa Bartlett, his former colleague on the Dana Point City Council, who is now a Orange County Supervisor.

Also completing filing for the seat is fellow Republican Laurie Davies, who is the mayor of Laguna Niguel. Six others have also taken steps toward filing for the race.

Stop the Clippers Arena

PG&E: In a victory for victims (including insurance companies and local governments, on Wednesday, U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Dennis Montali denied Pacific Gas and Electric Company‘s effort to throw out its liabilities from wildfires under the doctrine of “inverse condemnation.”

I’ve written extensively on the issue before but of course can’t link to any of The Nooner archives until the ATC site is back to normal. In short, inverse condemnation is a strict liability doctrine whereby negligence need not be shown to find liability from damage caused by a utility’s equipment, or that of a governmental entity. In theory, the utility is acting in the stead of the government by operating a franchise of an essential public service.

PG&E has been rebuffed by the Legislature to change state law on the subject. Last month, the United States Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal by San Diego Gas & Electric of a California Supreme Court decision challenging the application of inverse condemnation to a non-governmental entity is an unlawful takings under the Fifth Amendment.

Proponents of applying inverse condemnation to franchised utilities serving in the stead of governmental entities argue it is to avoid a Fifth Amendment quasi-governmental unconstitutional takings.

FIRE RELIEF: For San Jose Inside, Peter Byrne and Will Carruthers write that the Rebuild North Bay Foundation established after the 2017 Tubbs Fire by super-lobbyist Darius Anderson is slow to deliver on promises of relief according to an audit. They write:

During its first year of existence, most of the foundation’s revenue came from PG&E while the bulk of expenses went to management. It spent relatively little money on grants to the public, according to the audit. The foundation made erroneous claims in its tax return regarding its lobbying activities—serious errors which the organization said it will correct. Despite laws prohibiting such foundations from making campaign contributions, Rebuild North Bay donated cash to support local elected officials.

While Rebuild North Bay has performed some charitable acts, it has devoted more resources to creating a network of business people and local public officials to lobby bureaucrats and legislators in Washington DC. Under IRS rules, a charity may engage in some lobbying related to its purpose—but a primary focus on lobbying can cost its tax-exempt privilege.

According to multiple experts, Rebuild North Bay blurred the boundary between charity and political influence machine.

WATER: Jose A. Del Real has a great piece in the NYT in which he writes that the problem of poor drinking water in Central Valley and racially disparate impact is not a recent phenomenon and traces it back to the early 20th Century when black farmworkers arrived from the Cotton Bowl and Dust Bowl.

Amid a vast migration during the early 20th century, tens of thousands of black people like Ms. Beavers came to California’s farm country from far-off states in the Cotton Belt and the Dust Bowl.

And as in other parts of the United States, black migrants were met with Jim Crow-style racism: “Whites Only” signs, curfews and discriminatory practices by banks. Often, the only places black families could settle were on arid acres on the outskirts of cultivated farmland — places like Teviston, the all-black colony where Ms. Beavers raised 12 children in “a two-bedroom shack” with no bathrooms or running water.

KAMALA: In the NYT, an A-list political reporting team looks at what has fallen apart with the Kamala Harris presidential campaign which is beset by infighting and finger-pointing. And, they include a brutal November 11 resignation letter from the campaign’s former State Operations Director Kelly Mehlenbacher.

Congresswoman Marcie Fudge (D-OH), who is a backer of Kamala, has called for the ouster of Campaign Manager Juan Rodriguez, although others are saying that an equally big issue is Campaign Chair Maya Harris, sister of the candidate.

The Economist/YouGov national poll out this morning has Harris at 4% and the senator is at 3.8% in the Real Clear Politics average. She averages 3.3% in Iowa polls and 2.7% in New Hampshire. Her numbers are on the decline in South Carolina.

While Kamala is on the generally recognized presidential candidates for the California primary, she can pull her name off through December 26 if she and advisors fear an embarrassing showing in her home state could affect her political future–whether in a Democratic Administration as Attorney General or with a possible challenge for re-election from a fellow Democrat in 2022.

I do think that if Pete Buttigieg wins the Democratic nomination, she would be on the short list, but not after a prolonged primary of poor showings. I don’t think Joe Biden holds a grudge from the attacks she’s made, but I also don’t see her as a VP for him as he doesn’t need help in California and outperforms her with black voters.

As is often the case in such situations, the question is who would be the messenger.

MOTOR VOTER: Bryan Anderson reports for the Bee that the state DMV is asking for $2.2 million to handle voter registration in 2020.

It’s a fairly small sum, but it follows a $242 million increase in the DMV’s budget that Gov. Gavin Newsom granted the department in June.

Lawmakers and Newsom allocated more money for the department because it is handling a crunch of customers seeking so-called Real ID cards that Californians will need by October 2020 to board airplanes without a passport. The DMV’s total budget this year is $1.36 billion.

VAPING: For Politico, Steven Shepard reports on what motivated the Trump Administration to back off its announced plan to ban all flavored e-cigarette products:

Battleground state polling conducted for the industry by one of the president’s trusted campaign pollsters suggested a ban could tip the balance against the president — 96 percent of vapers said they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who wanted to ban flavored e-cigarettes.

The poll was only of vapers invited by emails provided by the Vapor Technology Association.

The polling memo states “[T]his passionate voting bloc (of vaping users) would rally behind a candidate who opposes banning flavors in all nicotine vapor products.”

Folks around the State Capitol who support banning flavors openly dismissed President Trump’s Oval Office announcement that the Food and Drug Administration would act on such a ban as unlikely to ever be implemented.

Shepard further writes about polling among the general public:

The latest POLITICO/Morning Consult poll demonstrates how out of line this small slice of the population is with the broader electorate on the issue. A 55 percent majority of voters support banning flavored e-cigarettes, the poll shows, while only 24 percent oppose a ban.

And only 11 percent of voters say they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who promised to ban flavored e-cigarettes — far fewer than the 30 percent who would be more likely to vote for a candidate who wanted to ban flavored vaping products and 44 percent who said it wouldn’t make a difference.

COX: In the SDUT, Jeff McDonald writes that 2018 GOP gubernatorial candidate John Cox’s campaign owes more than $97,000 after an arbitrator found in September that the campaign had failed to pay a $50,000 bill to a DC-based advertising firm. The committee had $13,104 on hand on June 30, so it’s likely the businessman will again be dipping into his pocket. He reportedly spent over $4 million of his own money on his failed effort.

AIDS HEALTHCARE FOUNDATION: For the LAT, David Zahniser reports:

A judge has thrown out a lawsuit from the AIDS Healthcare Foundation claiming that the city’s approval of residential towers violates housing anti-discrimination laws — the latest in a string of legal defeats for the group.

Superior Court Judge Robert S. Draper ruled earlier this month in favor of the city of Los Angeles and real estate companies pursuing four high-rise developments in Hollywood, all of them on Sunset Boulevard, where AIDS Healthcare has its headquarters.

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SACTOWN: In the Bee, Tony Bizjak writes about a Sacramento County sales tax measure that could be on next November’s ballot:

A group of city and county leaders is assembling a November 2020 ballot measure that would hike the local sales tax a half cent to improve transportation – with an emphasis on offering alternatives to more roads for more cars. The proposal, called Measure A, could raise more than $8 billion locally over the next 40 years for new bridges, light rail lines, bike paths, freeway interchanges and sidewalks to schools.

A draft proposal is expected to be presented to the Sacramento Transportation Authority board in two weeks, but a debate is already well underway about how much money should go to making car travel easier and how much should go to alternatives aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

DO YOU KNOW THE WAY TO SAN JOSÉ? In the Chron, Bob Egelko writes that an appeals court Tuesday held that San José must comply with state law requiring city-owned surplus land be made available for low-cost housing. The city, backed by the League of California Cities, argued that as a charter city, it could approve an ordinance that conflicted with state law.

Assuming the ruling in Anderson v. City of San José stands, it will apply to 121 of the largest cities in the state, including charter cities.

Senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) applauded the decision in a tweet:

This is big. Housing is a statewide concern: 3.5M home shortage, so many living in cars, the threat to our economy & climate goals. Some cities argue housing is a pure local issue. That attitude is why we’re in this mess & the court correctly rejected it.

THE OC WEEKLY: Will it stay or will it go? Wednesday was an odd day for the free entertainment and political rag long known for its liberal editorial sense and investigations of elected and other governmental officials. The official Twitter account posted:

Adios Motherfuckers! Today, the day before Thanksgiving, our owner Duncan McIntosh Company has decided to shut us down. For the last quarter century, we’ve tried to bring good stories to Orange County. It’s been fun, but now we’re done.

However, the Register’s Alicia Robinson writes that the owner subsequently put out a statement saying that he was in discussions with an unnamed buyer for the paper.

“The Weekly has built a tremendous reputation for its hard hitting coverage that’s cost more than one self-serving government official his job. We hope to have more details after the holiday about the expected change of ownership by a local businessman,” the statement said. It also praised the paper’s journalists for their work “calling out those who were giving less to the county than to themselves.”

CAKEDAY: Happy birthday to  Barry Brokaw!

GHOSTS OF CAKEDAYS PAST: Thanksgiving birthdays include Bruce BaronBenito Delgado-OlsonSasha Horwitz,  Emmie JohnsonKathryn Austin Scott. and former Assemblymember Sandré Swanson!

FAREWELL: Former Assemblymember and Senator Phil Wyman (1945-2019)

calstatela-201910

Classifieds

Add your classified now both in The Nooner and online
for $50/week or $150/month by emailing
scottlay@gmail.com, with a headline, a summary of up to 200 words, and what you’d like the end date to be. You can attach a PDF or provide a link for a bigger job description/info to apply. [Other advertising options]

 

PREMIER OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
Four new construction offices available for immediate sublease, located in a Class A office building, one block from the capitol building. Two window units and two interior units, available individually or as a group. Access to two conference rooms with seating up to 25. For price and availability, please call 916-217-2616.
Finance Director/Call Time Manager
Manage fundraising operations, including call time for leading Democratic candidate in competitive open Assembly District race. Reports to campaign manager. Must have direct fundraising experience with campaign or non-profit fundraising, ability to manage call time, donor acknowledgement, work with finance committee and major donors, and events. Attention to detail a must. Send resume & at least 2 professional references to MR@MaryRoseAssociates.com – with Finance Director in subject line.
Campaign Coordinator
Manage day-to-day campaign operations for competitive open Assembly District race for leading Democratic candidate; reports to campaign manager. Experience in field, volunteer recruitment, fundraising, campaign management or the equivalent. Knowledge/experience in Santa Barbara and/or Ventura County helpful. Send resume & at least 2 professional references to MR@MaryRoseAssociates.com – with Campaign Coordinator in subject line.
So you think you want to sponsor a bill?
For the first time, Capitol Seminars will be offering an immersive session addressing the entire range of activity involved in sponsoring legislation: from the process involved in making the decision to seek a legislative solution all the way through post-enactment necessities.“So you think you want to sponsor a bill?” is a unique seminar opportunity presented by a roster of distinguished guest faculty each of whom is expert in a specialized particular part of this deeply immersive curriculum.For further information or to register for this December 12 seminar, please email us at judco12000@yahoo.com or call us at 916 442-5009.
Capitol Seminars December 2019 Sessions
One of the MOST IMPORTANT DATES on a lobbyist’s calendar is the day the Legislature reconvenes; in the present case January 6, 2020.Because each step of the legislative process can be “make or break”, Capitol Seminars offers our final sessions of the year in December to address the complexities of a bill’s journey with specific focus on helping you prepare for the unknown moving forward, finish and optimize unfinished business, and analyze and learn from what has already occurred.Our December 5-6 sessions conducted by 44-year Capitol veteran Ray LeBov, have already reached 75% capacity.If this MOST IMPORTANT DATE resonates with you, REGISTER HERE or call Ray with questions (916) 442-5009.
SEIU-UHW – Government Relations Advocate/Organizer (Sacramento, CA)
The Government Relations Organizer in the Political Department reports to the Assistant Director for Government Relations and is responsible for a broad range of program objectives to advance SEIU-UHW’s strategic goals through legislative advocacy, coalition building, and regulatory advocacy.SEIU-UHW offers a competitive salary, commensurate with experience, and a generous benefit package. For more information on the position and to apply please visit our candidate portal at seiuunitedhealthcareworkers.appone.com
Account Supervisor/Director (Los Angeles) – Fiona Hutton and Associates
Fiona Hutton & Associates is looking for a highly-driven communications pro to join our Los Angeles-based agency as an Account Supervisor or Director (depending on experience).The position requires a minimum 5-7 years of experience in public affairs, public relations or politics, with agency experience required. Responsible for managing integrated communications and advocacy programs, creative content, media relations & coalitions. Will oversee operational performance of accounts, serve as day-to-day contact with clients and mentor junior staff.For full qualifications and responsibilities, read the job description at www.fionahuttonassoc.com/careers/account-supervisor-director/.Interested candidates should submit a cover letter and resume to resume@fionahuttonassoc.com.
The McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific
The McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, offers the Master of Public Administration (MPA) and the Master of Public Policy (MPP) degrees to both full-time students and those earning a professional degree while working. Our focus on the interconnections of law, policy, management, and leadership provides unique competencies for your success. Students gain a foundation in statutory interpretation and regulatory processes critical to governance. Learn at a beautiful campus three miles from the State Capitol: go.mcgeorge.edu/publicpolicy or publicpolicy@pacific.edu.
Political Data Inc.
For 30 Years PDI has been California’s premier data vendor. Now, you can get live online trainings on the newest PDI software every week:

The Nooner for Wednesday, November 27, presented by SYASL Partners

mrc-300x250-GIF_Nooner

NEW POD: SacTown Talks by The Nooner (Gibran Maciel and Scott Lay): Noel Kammermann, executive director of Loaves and Fishes (2019-11-26) [YouTube | iTunes | Simplecast]

IN TODAY’S NOONER:

  • AD57 (Whittier): Ian Calderon not running for re-election!
  • Dammit Janus!
  • Gimme air!
  • More air please!
  • PG&NoE!
  • Devin!
  • Adam!
  • Muni matters
  • Cakeday and Classifieds

Happy Thanksgiving Eve! Hopefully you weathered the storm last night. I didn’t lose power although it did flicker a few times and I know from social media that many of you did go without for several hours.

As you can tell, we’re still on the temporary solution today and I continue to work on the server.

OPEN AD57 (Whittier)! Yesterday, Assembly Majority Leader Ian Calderon tweeted a letter announcing that he would not seek re-election next year, catching many of his legislative colleagues by surprise. Elected in 2012, Calderon could easily continue to serve through 2024.

In the letter, Calderon cited family reasons and not in the typical political sense. Rather, he cited the upcoming third child of Ian and his wife, which will bring them to three children under the age of three next year.

Calderon has been well-regarded in Sacramento and was seen as restoring the family name of his father after his two uncles got caught up in federal bribery charges. Without Ian after 2020, it will be the first time since 1982 that a Calderon is not in the Legislature, according to legislative history guru Alex Vassar at the California State Library.

As a seat without an eligible candidate not running, the filing deadline now is extended by five days to December 11. The very Latino working-class southeast Los Angeles County district includes Whittier. South El Monte, Santa Fe Springs, Norwalk, La Mirada, Hacienda Heights, and La Puente.

Several names are already being talked about for the safe Democratic district, including Hacienda La Puente USD board member Martin Medrano, who is the district director for Rep. Gil Cisneros. Another possible candidate is Louis Reyes, who is currently a candidate for Whittier mayor at the same March 3, 2020 election. Reyes, who works privately in political communications, has worked for both the State Senate and State Assembly and you know what that puts into one’s blood.

By tonight we likely will see some candidates who have responded to the news and pulled papers. As of this morning, only Green Fernando Landeros and Republican Jessica Martinez have pulled papers.

Stop the Clippers Arena

DAMMIT JANUS! In the Bee, Wes Venteicher reports that the Libertarian think tank Freedom Foundation filed a lawsuit against unions representing University of California employees alleging that the unions continue to collect “fair share” representational fees to non-members, which were declared unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court in last year’s Janus v. AFSCME. Specifically, the complaint alleges that the unions have set up a difficult and lengthy process to leave the union. Here is the foundation’s press release announcing the suit.

The foundation has also filed suit against the California Teachers Association with the same allegations. That case was recently heard in the United States District Court for the Northern District in California.

GIMME AIR! For CalMatters, Rachel Becker writes that the California Air Resources Board is asking the federal government for clarification as to how to administer the withdrawal of the waiver that has allowed California to set higher tailpipe standards for cars and light trucks. The state has sued the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Board over the regulations published September 27 and in this latest requests, asks the agencies to reconsider the decision. As the regulations were published 60 days ago, they are to take effect now, while the court hears the case.

MORE AIR PLEASE! The initiative process in California doesn’t always use the same playbook. While most initiative backers submit the full language written by lawyers, any citizen can submit language and pay $2,000 to have the state’s attorneys write it (same fee either way).

Yesterday, a proponent submitted language for an initiative to ban the sale or registration of a car or light truck that is neither a hybrid nor all electric and manufactured after 2020.

Perfect timing as I-5 is basically shutdown over the Grapevine the day before Thanksgiving and people are sitting in their cars with the heater on. Same thing about I-80 over the last couple of days and everyone on the mountain roads around Tahoe and the Southern California resort towns around Arrowhead and Big Bear.

My last two cars were hybrid and all-electric, but this is just silly and why we have lawmakers and hearings to draft legislation, as imperfect as it may be.

PG&noE! Assemblymember James Gallagher (R-Yuba City) has an op-ed for F&H on the preferred solution of his and Senator Jim Nielsen (R-Gerber) to speed up the upgrades to Pacific Gas & Electric’s antiquated grid.

DEVIN! In a defense filing in the defamation case filed by Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Tulare) responding to a subpoena for records of former Democratic National Committee employee Adam Parkhomenko, the defense argues that the @DevinCow Twitter account is obviously a parody because cows clearly can’t be behind the account as they do not have opposable thumbs. For the Bee, Hannah Wiley and Kate Irby report.

Parkhamenko tweets:

Proud to have the backs of ⁦@DevinCow⁩, ⁦@NunesAlt⁩ and ⁦@LizMair⁩. Devin Nunes won’t be scaring or intimidating anyone. The only thing he’s getting is more of the same.

The case is in Virginia State Court where Nunes resides while in DC. The defendants unsuccessfully tried to get it transferred to California.

ADAM! In the LAT, Jennifer Haberkorn looks at the impact of the impeachment hearings on House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Burbank):

The effort to impeach President Trump still has months to run, but already has produced at least one clear winner: Rep. Adam B. Schiff has emerged from two weeks of public hearings as a rising star among Democrats, one with enhanced power to aid his House colleagues even as he bedevils the president.
With no special counsel involved in investigating Trump’s actions toward Ukraine, Schiff, a federal prosecutor before he won his Burbank-based congressional seat, has taken the role of lead inquisitor and public face of the probe. He’s the Kenneth Starr of the Trump impeachment — or to use the comparison he would prefer, the Leon Jaworski, special prosecutor during Watergate.

 

Republicans from Trump on down accuse him of unfairness and bias. Schiff’s fellow Democrats, however, have heaped praise on the way he kept Republicans at bay and maintained control during the impeachment hearings while generating enough news to keep the inquiry — and his name — in headlines for weeks on end.

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BARF! In the Examiner, Laura Watson and Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez report:

People of color have been disproportionately targeted by BART police officers for eating or drinking on trains and on BART platforms, the San Francisco Examiner has learned.

Data on citations for police code violations pertaining to eating and drinking on BART obtained by the Examiner after a public records request reveal that out of the 55 people cited since Oct. 1, 2014, more than 80 percent were people of color.

African Americans were cited most frequently for consuming food or drinks on BART, with a total of 33 citations given to black passengers. Latino and “other” ethnic groups comprised the second largest group cited since Oct. 1, 2014, with 13 citations.

White passengers comprised just nine of the citations, and the ethnicity of one person cited in the time period for which data was requested was marked as “unknown.”

The records request was filed after a man was detained earlier this month for eating a sandwich at the Pleasant Hill BART Station. A viral video of the interaction between passenger Steve Foster and BART police Officer D. McCormick showed the officer handcuffing Foster and walking him off the platform.

BAGHDAD BY THE BAY: For SF Curbed, Adam Brinklow writes that Supervisor Matt Haney is championing the cause of free public bathrooms available 24 hours a day. Brinklow writes:

San Francisco Supervisor Matt Haney’s biggest public legacy may be in the toilet—which is exactly where the District Six lawmaker wants it. Haney has asked for all of the city’s public Pit Stop public bathrooms to open 24 hours a day.

Earlier this year, Haney pushed a pilot program keeping three Pit Stop toilets open for use around the clock. On Monday, he touted the success of the program with a rally in front of a toilet in the Tenderloin—presumably a first in city history.

Haney argues that reliable access to restrooms is a basic necessity for more than just SF’s homeless residents, citing night uses by “children, seniors, tourists, taxi drivers, couriers, Uber drivers, people leaving bars, neighborhood residents, anyone and everyone because all people poop and pee.”

Haney was arrested yesterday along with hundreds of others at San Francisco International Airport in one of many demonstrations across the country to support unionization of airport contract catering workers employed by corporations such as LSG Sky Chefs and Gate Gourmet.

Also in fun airport news, Terminal 2 at Oakland International Airport lost power for awhile last night delaying many flights and requiring a re-processing through security, already overloaded with holiday travel.

OAKTOWN: For the East Bay Times, Ali Tadayon reports on the efforts of the City of Oakland to get a superior court’s ruling that its Measure AA parcel tax did not have sufficient votes to pass at the November 2018 election.

Oakland is fighting to overturn an Alameda County Superior Court judge’s October declaration that a $198 parcel tax ballot measure did not garner enough votes to pass, despite the City Council deciding that it had.

Not everyone at City Hall is in favor of continuing the fight, however. Mayor Libby Schaaf supports appealing the ruling, but council members Rebecca Kaplan and Lynette Gibson McElhaney say the city would be better off accepting defeat.

The issue is that the measure was ruled a special tax, which was reflected in the City Attorney official analysis. A special tax (dedicated to specified purposes) requires a two-thirds vote, while a general tax requires a simple majority. It’s one of the most nonsensical provisions in California election law.

The measure received 62.47% of the vote rather than the 66.7% needed.

LA-LA LAND: In the LAT, Steve Lopez writes about a citizen who cleans up the Los Angeles River as rains push “millions of pounds” of trash into the on-again, off-again waterway (best known from CHiPs police chases). Lopez writes:

Hideous, shameful, grotesque. These were the words that came to mind. And with a storm expected to batter Los Angeles this week, a lot more of the same will be heading downstream.

[Josey] Peters, who spends hours every week filling large trash bags on L.A.’s beaches and tributaries, retrieved a piece of furniture from the water’s edge.

“Gotta get that out of here,” he said. “No chairs in the ocean.”

SANDY EGGO: For Voice of San Diego, Andrew Keatts writes up the financial troubles of the San Diego regional governing agency:

The regional sales tax measure TransNet has been mired in scandal for three years, but the scale of its financial problems, which predate that scandal, are still settling in.

This month, the agency’s chief economist found a new way to convey the financial straits facing TransNet, the transportation program funded by 2004’s voter-approved sales tax measure.

When San Diego voters stop paying the half-cent sales tax in 2048, Ray Major said, they will have received about half of the regional transportation improvements promised to them at the ballot box.

And that’s the optimistic outlook. It could be much worse.

CAKEDAY: Happy birthday to  Reyna Del Haro, Christopher Guerrero, John Hanna, Luis Marquez, and Rich Ochoa!

calstatela-201910

Classifieds

Add your classified now both in The Nooner and online
for $50/week or $150/month by emailing
scottlay@gmail.com, with a headline, a summary of up to 200 words, and what you’d like the end date to be. You can attach a PDF or provide a link for a bigger job description/info to apply. [Other advertising options]

 

PREMIER OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
Four new construction offices available for immediate sublease, located in a Class A office building, one block from the capitol building. Two window units and two interior units, available individually or as a group. Access to two conference rooms with seating up to 25. For price and availability, please call 916-217-2616.
Finance Director/Call Time Manager
Manage fundraising operations, including call time for leading Democratic candidate in competitive open Assembly District race. Reports to campaign manager. Must have direct fundraising experience with campaign or non-profit fundraising, ability to manage call time, donor acknowledgement, work with finance committee and major donors, and events. Attention to detail a must. Send resume & at least 2 professional references to MR@MaryRoseAssociates.com – with Finance Director in subject line.
Campaign Coordinator
Manage day-to-day campaign operations for competitive open Assembly District race for leading Democratic candidate; reports to campaign manager. Experience in field, volunteer recruitment, fundraising, campaign management or the equivalent. Knowledge/experience in Santa Barbara and/or Ventura County helpful. Send resume & at least 2 professional references to MR@MaryRoseAssociates.com – with Campaign Coordinator in subject line.
So you think you want to sponsor a bill?
For the first time, Capitol Seminars will be offering an immersive session addressing the entire range of activity involved in sponsoring legislation: from the process involved in making the decision to seek a legislative solution all the way through post-enactment necessities.“So you think you want to sponsor a bill?” is a unique seminar opportunity presented by a roster of distinguished guest faculty each of whom is expert in a specialized particular part of this deeply immersive curriculum.For further information or to register for this December 12 seminar, please email us at judco12000@yahoo.com or call us at 916 442-5009.
Capitol Seminars December 2019 Sessions
One of the MOST IMPORTANT DATES on a lobbyist’s calendar is the day the Legislature reconvenes; in the present case January 6, 2020.Because each step of the legislative process can be “make or break”, Capitol Seminars offers our final sessions of the year in December to address the complexities of a bill’s journey with specific focus on helping you prepare for the unknown moving forward, finish and optimize unfinished business, and analyze and learn from what has already occurred.Our December 5-6 sessions conducted by 44-year Capitol veteran Ray LeBov, have already reached 75% capacity.If this MOST IMPORTANT DATE resonates with you, REGISTER HERE or call Ray with questions (916) 442-5009.
SEIU-UHW – Government Relations Advocate/Organizer (Sacramento, CA)
The Government Relations Organizer in the Political Department reports to the Assistant Director for Government Relations and is responsible for a broad range of program objectives to advance SEIU-UHW’s strategic goals through legislative advocacy, coalition building, and regulatory advocacy.SEIU-UHW offers a competitive salary, commensurate with experience, and a generous benefit package. For more information on the position and to apply please visit our candidate portal at seiuunitedhealthcareworkers.appone.com
Account Supervisor/Director (Los Angeles) – Fiona Hutton and Associates
Fiona Hutton & Associates is looking for a highly-driven communications pro to join our Los Angeles-based agency as an Account Supervisor or Director (depending on experience).The position requires a minimum 5-7 years of experience in public affairs, public relations or politics, with agency experience required. Responsible for managing integrated communications and advocacy programs, creative content, media relations & coalitions. Will oversee operational performance of accounts, serve as day-to-day contact with clients and mentor junior staff.For full qualifications and responsibilities, read the job description at www.fionahuttonassoc.com/careers/account-supervisor-director/.Interested candidates should submit a cover letter and resume to resume@fionahuttonassoc.com.
The McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific
The McGeorge School of Law, University of the Pacific, offers the Master of Public Administration (MPA) and the Master of Public Policy (MPP) degrees to both full-time students and those earning a professional degree while working. Our focus on the interconnections of law, policy, management, and leadership provides unique competencies for your success. Students gain a foundation in statutory interpretation and regulatory processes critical to governance. Learn at a beautiful campus three miles from the State Capitol: go.mcgeorge.edu/publicpolicy or publicpolicy@pacific.edu.
Political Data Inc.
For 30 Years PDI has been California’s premier data vendor. Now, you can get live online trainings on the newest PDI software every week:

The Nooner for Tuesday, November 26, sponsored by SYASL Partners

mrc-300x250-GIF_Nooner

NEW POD: SacTown Talks by The Nooner (Gibran Maciel and Scott Lay): Noel Kammermann, executive director of Loaves and Fishes (2019-11-26) [YouTube | iTunes | Simplecast]

IN TODAY’S NOONER:

  • Loaves and Fishes
  • Cave Fire
  • Money matters: the state’s finances
  • PG&E
  • Nunes
  • Housing
  • Cannabis
  • How we work
  • Cue Lorena
  • Muni matters
  • Cakeday

Good morning! It’s Turkey Taco Tuesday! If you weren’t aware, turkeys were first domesticated in ancient Mexico. The bird, which is called pavo in our neighbor to our south is eaten year-round in many parts of Mexico. I know it is heretical to say on this particular week, but pavo con mole is far more delicious than turkey with gravy.

Obviously, I’m continuing with the Band-Aid approach to getting The Nooner to you. I’m literally inspecting hundreds of files to discover the problem. Some folks have asked why I haven’t moved it to a new server. I have tried that but there are two problems. First it’s about 50 gigabytes in total, leading to transfer time outs. Second, my transferring all the files, it replicates the exact problem. The only way to solve it is to find the malignant code, which is a time-consuming, manual process.

This is the biggest server problem I’ve had in twenty years of doing a variety of projects that many of you are familiar with, including The Nooner that began in earnest eight years ago.

I feel bad but it could be worse. It’s a holiday week and many of you are taking time off. Further, I’m not running the database that is having glitches at the California Employment Development Department and leading toward delayed unemployment checks this week. Hannah Wiley writes for the Bee that the checks may arrive Wednesday.

Of course, Thursday is a bank holiday and we know how those electronic payments get sat on by banks…

Above you will note that Gibran and I recorded a new podcast yesterday afternoon with Noel Kammermann, executive director of Sacramento homeless services nonprofit Loaves and Fishes. It was a fascinating discussion about the literal homeless crises we have in Sacramento and other cities around the state. The problem is bigger than we know about and things are not moving nearly quickly enough on either short-term or long-term solutions.

It wasn’t lost on us that we were recording the day before harsh winter storm hits. While most of us are happy to see the rainy forecast to suppress the Cave Fire, the cold, wet weather is a serious threat to those on the streets. And, we learned yesterday that there are far fewer shelter beds and no cold weather shelters in Sacramento because of changes this year.

Donate to Loaves and Fishes. – Let’s raise some Nooner cash for the very important work they are doing this week and all year long (particularly the winter). They accept no government money and are a nondenominational nonprofit.

As many of you will be traveling tomorrow or Thursday, I think you’ll find it a timely conversation of what we give thanks for and to understand the urgency toward doing something about it. So, load up your podcatcher and the one-hour, ten-minute pod will hopefully make your flight or drive that much more interesting.

CAVE FIRE: Obviously, the Bee’s article yesterday about the approaching end of fire season with the large storm expected this afternoon was no solace to the people around Santa Barbara last night who were watching a nightmarish fire that started in the Los Padres National Forest and quickly burned down the mountain toward the cities mostly on the south side of Highway 101. Within three hours, the fire grew from 200 to 3,100 acres.

As of this morning, it is 4,100 and zero percent contained but the wind has died down.

There was immediate suspicion based on where the fire broke out that Southern California Edison lines could be to blame. There was no public safety power shutoff in place when winds whipped up (the “sundowner” winds) that made what we saw yesterday in Sacramento seem like a ceiling fan. In Montecito east of Santa Barbara, a gust was measured at 82 MPH last night.

As usual, the hashtag #CaveFire has been taken over by adult spam bots. Twitter has banned political ads, but lets this crap continue.

 

Stop the Clippers Arena

MONEY MATTERS: While I have wrestled with server issues, the Legislative Analyst’s Office released its annual fiscal outlook and the news looks good while it notes that there are signs of an economic slowdown although it’s unclear when it will hit state revenues. It states:

We estimate the state has a surplus of $7 billion for 2020-21. A portion of this $7 billion would be available for one-time commitments and a portion for new, ongoing commitments. (The surplus is $4 billion if the managed care organization [MCO] tax is not approved by the federal government.)

PG&E: In the Bee, Andrew Sheeler reports on new technology that Pacific Gas & Electric is looking at to the utility hopes will prevent wildfires caused by PG&E’s equipment:

Distribution Fault Anticipation, as the technology is called, uses a predictive algorithm to assess electric systems and identify potential equipment failures, not unlike how a modern vehicle’s on-board computer works by “telling you everything there is to know of what’s wrong with the car,” said B. Don Russell.

PG&E does not expect any public safety power shutoffs with the storm as winds have calmed down and the winds aren’t expected to return until they come with precipitation.

NUNES: For Politico, Jeremy B. White reports that the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has begun running digital ads to tie Rep. Devin Nunes to the Ukranian allegations. White writes:

A new wave of digital ads amplifies the charge that Nunes met with a Ukrainian ex-official linked to impeachment proceedings to seek political ammunition. While Nunes has rejected that as “demonstrably false,” Democrats have argued Nunes should face an ethics investigation.
The online spots will assail Nunes for using taxpayer money on “political dirty work” — a reference to a trip to Europe during which an indicted former associate of Rudy Giuliani maintains Nunes met with former Ukrainian Prosecutor General Viktor Shokin.

HOUSING: For MediaNewsGroup, Marisa Kendall asks whether the state’s housing acceleration law–SB 35–is working to spur more development. Kendall writes:

So far, California city officials have approved or are still considering more than 6,000 homes proposed under the law — including about 4,500 in the Bay Area, according to this news organization’s analysis of anecdotal reports and city and county data.

The majority are subsidized units for low-income renters, including the homeless, seniors and people with disabilities — which advocates say is evidence that the law is protecting the region’s most vulnerable residents. In some cities, officials are approving projects out of fear that if they don’t, they’ll be hit with an SB 35 application that they might like even less, but can’t reject. Other communities are fighting the law, sparking multiple lawsuits.

Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, drafted SB 35 to force reluctant cities to approve housing in a climate where residential production hasn’t kept up with booming demand. Cities and counties that fail to approve enough housing (95% of California jurisdictions as of June) are subject to the law, which forces them to automatically green-light certain residential and mixed-use projects if they meet a city’s zoning and planning rules.

Wiener is expected to try to push his controversial housing density bill, SB 50, in January when the Legislature returns. He faces fierce opposition to the bipartisan bill including from members of his own caucus. Opponents argue that it’s a state takeover of local zoning, while proponents argue the cities are caving to NIMBY opposition and accepts state transportation funds without increasing density near public transportation and job corridors.

Bills introduced last year that didn’t have a final vote are called “two-year bills” and must be passed by January 31.

CANNABIS: For the LAT, Patrick McGreevy reports that the state is siding in court with cannabis delivery companies over cities and counties in the fight over whether deliveries can occur in localities that have not allowed any dispensaries. He writes:

Earlier this month, Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra filed a motion on behalf of the California Bureau of Cannabis Control to join a lawsuit by Salinas-based East of Eden Cannabis Co. against Santa Cruz County, which has banned deliveries by companies it has not licensed.

The legal action comes as a group of cities is challenging California’s home delivery rules in Fresno County Superior Court, arguing that state law allows them to decide whether businesses can sell pot in their communities. In January, the Bureau of Cannabis Control issued regulations that permit firms it licenses to deliver marijuana to homes anywhere in the state, including in cities and counties that have banned pot shops.

HOW WE WORK: For CalMatters, Judy Lin writes up what the future of work looks like in California. Lin writes:

Over the next decade, jobs mostly held by the working poor appear to be most at risk of displacement: food services, manufacturing, transportation and warehousing, agriculture and retail. The least likely to be automated by 2030? Professional, management and educational services, and jobs in health care and social assistance.

State leaders fear that, if something isn’t done before the next wave of automation, what’s left will be “f-ing feudalism,” to borrow one politician’s expletive. Gov. Gavin Newsom wants to figure out how to make future jobs pay well. A key question his Future of Work Commission is asking: What role should organized labor have?

CUE LORENA: In the WaPo, Greg Bensinger writes that Google has fired four employees involved in a pro-worker rally last week for “violations of its policies around accessing and sharing internal documents and calendars.” Bensinger reports:

[Rebecca] Rivers, a worker in Boulder, Colo., suggested at Friday’s rally that she had been targeted for her activism at the company. “Instead of listening to me or thousands of my co-workers, Google has punished me by putting me on administrative leave,” she said at the rally. “I believe everyone has a right to know what their work is being used for.”

In the memo, Google said some employees “felt scared or unsafe, and requested to work from another location,” after learning their calendars were being monitored.

MICKEY D’S: John Antczak reports for AP on the settlement agreement between McDonald’s and a class of employees over wages and working conditions. He writes:

McDonald’s has agreed to a $26 million settlement of a long-running class-action lawsuit over wages and work conditions at corporate-run locations in California, the parties said Monday.

The agreement, which estimates the settlement covers about 38,000 individuals, requires the approval of a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge.

The lawsuit filed nearly seven years ago against McDonald’s Restaurants of California Inc. made an array of claims including failure to pay minimum and overtime wages and to provide required meal and rest breaks.

THE GUV’S APPROVAL: Joel Fox looks at Governor Gavin Newsom‘s approval rating in the latest PPIC poll.

LAW AND DISORDER: In the Chron, legal eagle Bob Egelko writes up a 4-3 divided Supreme Court of California case that concludes that failure to produce a driver’s license does not mean that an officer can conduct a warrantless search. The case is P. v. Lopez and originated out of Woodland in Yolo County from a traffic stop after an anonymous tip about erratic driving. The officer did not witness any traffic violations or erratic driving, which complicated the city’s case.

It’s unclear whether or not the case will be appealed to the Supreme Court of the United States, which can be done since the decision is about the Fourth Amendment and has had a final decision by the highest state court. The case was passed off from the city to the state Office of the Attorney General.

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BAGHDAD BY THE BAY: Trisha Thadani reports for the Chron “Despite City Hall’s efforts to save San Francisco’s board-and-care homes, the facilities for the homeless, mentally ill and drug addicted are still rapidly closing around the city — and officials are running out of places to send the residents.”

SF NIMBY: For KQED, Matthew Green reports that a judge has again denied opponents’ attempt to stop the Embarcadero Navigation Center to serve the homeless. Green writes:

The decision, announced on Monday, clears the way for the 200-bed navigation center on a 2.3-acre South Beach lot, where homeless residents can receive round-the-clock supportive housing and rehabilitative services. The city broke ground on the facility in August and hopes to open it by the end of the year, the mayor’s office said.

“With these legal challenges put to rest, we can focus on what really matters — helping people get off the streets and into shelter and care,” Mayor London Breed said in a statement. “I’m committed to continuing on our progress so that we can open 1,000 new shelter beds by the end of next year.”

Since March, when Breed first proposed the facility, the project has faced intense pushback from a group of local residents who claim it will bring blight and crime to the tourist-heavy neighborhood, and cause property values to plummet.

OAKTOWN: For the East Bay Times, Ali Tadayon writes that Oakland has placed a parcel tax on the March ballot. Tadayon writes:

The tax, if passed, is estimated to generate $21 million annually for 20 years — $13.44 million would be used for parks, landscape maintenance and recreational services; $6.3 million would be used for homeless support services; $1.05 million would be used to fix and clean storm drains; and $210,000 to be used for auditing and overseeing the tax.

SACTOWN: I missed this yesterday as the story date is from September. However, CapRadio’s Scott Rodd has updated his coverage of the issue of property owners being fined for illegal cannabis grows when they have rented out property. Rodd writes:

The city of Sacramento has assessed almost $100 million in fines against property owners for illegal cannabis cultivation. At least $51 million of those fines are being challenged, often by landlords who claimed their tenants grew the cannabis without their knowledge.

It’s collected $5.5 million from those fines, as hundreds of property owners have challenged more than $50 million of the penalties. Dozens of them say they rented to tenants who operated the illegal grows without their knowledge, despite following best practices as a landlord.

LA-LA LAND: In the LAT, Dakota Smith writes that mayor Eric Garcetti has abandoned his campaign promise to require city employees to begin paying a portion of their health care costs. Smith writes:

“Under contracts signed this year that were supported by the mayor, many of City Hall’s largest unions will continue to contribute nothing toward their healthcare premiums. Garcetti also backed agreements with several smaller unions, allowing those employees who had been contributing 10% of their premiums to stop paying in January.”

CAKEDAY: Happy birthday to Ray Bishop, Dustin Call, Pete Conaty, Sean Doherty, Stacie Frerichs, Edie Lambert, Jason Murphy, and Bart Reed!

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Happy Monday! My AroundTheCapitol site is still down and IBM is now being totally unresponsive. Obviously, the server is working if you are reading this, as this domain is on the same server as AroundTheCapitol. It’s a strange problem, with all ATC pages returning “file not found,” even though all the files are still there. I didn’t make any changes but it seems like an overnight software update caused it. Of course, that means that I can’t even email you from the domain.

As I tweeted Saturday, advertising and subscriptions will be extended for the lost days.

Anyway, what a Niners game last night. I think we can say amidst the doubts that they are indeed for real. Gibran and I sit down for a pod this afternoon with Loaves and Fishes executive director Noel Kammermann this afternoon. Obviously, this Thanksgiving week with poor weather forecast makes a great time to check in with the private nonprofit that feeds the hungry and shelters the homeless. They are expecting to feed nearly 1,000 needy folks tomorrow for their biggest meal of the year.

Let’s get some news out.

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OH, DEVIN: Yesterday, the news blew up to include allegations that Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Tulare) met with the Ukranian prosecutor to seek an investigation of Joe Biden and son Hunter. Laura King reports for the LAT:

“Late Friday, CNN reported that Lev Parnas, an indicted associate of Trump personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani, was prepared to tell Congress that Nunes had met late last year in Vienna with Viktor Shokin, formerly the top Ukrainian prosecutor, to obtain information about the Bidens. The network cited one of Parnas’ lawyers as the source of the allegation.

On Sunday, in a Fox News interview, Nunes declined to directly answer a question about that allegation, but threatened to sue CNN for reporting it.

Of course, he’s a fan of suing those critical of him including the Fresno Bee and Twitter accounts such as @DevinCow.

As Evan Semones reports for Politico, Nunes is expected to be called before the House Ethics Committee with accusations that he used public funds for an essentially political purpose. He was chair of House Intelligence at the time of the alleged meeting.

The NYT’s Catie Edmonson writes:

“Neither Mr. Shokin nor Mr. Nunes has confirmed that the meeting happened, and Mr. Parnas has no direct knowledge of what may have been discussed. But Mr. Shokin had falsely suggested that he was ousted under pressure from Vice President Biden because he was investigating a company where Hunter Biden was a director, and he has subsequently made claims about the United States ambassador to Ukraine, Marie L. Yovanovitch, aligning him with Mr. Trump.”

Eyes are on the 46-year-old Nunes who could elect to retire rather than testify under oath with the threat of perjury.

Meanwhile, CA22 Democratic challengers Phil Arballo and Bobby Bliatout are raising money off the allegations. However, it’s a tough hall in district that Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton by 9.5% in 2016.

If he is forced to resign, a key date is May 2, as that’s the 180 day mark prior to the November 3 general election. If he steps down before then, there would be a special election for the remainder of Nunes’s current term. After that, the seat would remain vacant pending the November election.

Of course, he has refused to answer the allegation, but there seems to be enough evidence to warrant an Ethics investigation. There are ten members on House Ethics, split evenly among the two parties. There are no Californians on the committee.

There’s a question as to whether House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy will cut Nunes loose, another headache for the Majority Leader who is already dealing with the Duncan Hunter situation.

Just out of speculation, Devon Mathis (R-Visalia) lives in CA22. Assemblyman Vince Fong (R-Bakersfield) lives in Kevin McCarthy‘s district and used to work for the then House Majority Leader. In the State Senate, freshman Andreas Borgeas (R-Bakersfield) lives in the district.
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CA15 (Hayward-Pleasanton-Livermore): The Chron’s Tal Kopan reports on Rep. Eric Swalwell‘s role in the impeachment hearings. He’s on both House Intelligence which held hearings last week and House Judiciary, which will likely be drawing up the articles of impeachment next.

Other Californians on Judiciary are Zoe Lofgren, Karen Bass, Ted Lieu, Lou Correa, and Tom McClintock.

CA36 (Coachella): In the Desert Sun, Shane Newell and Colin Atagi report that a potential challenger to Democratic Rep. Raul Ruiz was arrested over the weekend in Indio. They write:

“Gina Chapa, 40, was arrested about 9 a.m. Saturday and released later that day after posting $10,000 bail, according to county jail records. She is scheduled to appear in court on Jan. 23 in Indio.

Chapa announced last month she would challenge Ruiz for his congressional seat, but she hasn’t filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission. The Indio resident was the Democratic congressman’s director of constituent services from 2013 to 2015 before a failed bid for Indio City Council in 2016.”

PROP 13: For KQED, Julie Chang looks at the debate over the future of property tax-limiting Proposition 13. In the PPIC poll released last week, 46% of likely voters supported the measure, 45% opposed, and 9% were undecided. Those results definitely disappointed backers, but they don’t intend to give up. Among all adults, support was 55% and 37% opposed.

LAW AND ORDER: The Bee’s Wes Venteicher reports that Governor Gavin Newsom would like to close a prison, although it’s easier said than done. Prisons are a primary employer in many rural areas, including Blythe and Susanville. Venteicher writes:

“I would like to see, in my lifetime and hopefully my tenure, that we shut down a state prison,” he said. “But you can’t do that flippantly. And you can’t do that without the support of the unions, support of these communities, the staff, and that requires an alternative that can meet everyone’s needs and desires.”

Here’s a fascinating report by the Pew Research Center on criminal justice reforms recently enacted by states across the country.

beJUULed: Over the weekend, Julie Creswell and Sheila Kaplan had a great in-depth story in the NYT on the growth of JUUL Labs and whether they focused advertising and promotional events to target youth. They write:

“As youth vaping soared and “juuling” became a high school craze, the company’s top executives have stood firm in their assertion that Juul’s mission has always been to give adult smokers a safer alternative to cigarettes, which play a role in the deaths of 480,000 people in the United States each year.

“We never wanted any non-nicotine user and certainly nobody underage to ever use Juul products,” James Monsees, a co-founder of the company, testified at a congressional hearing in July.

But in reality, the company was never just about helping adult smokers, according to interviews with former executives, employees and investors, along with reviews of legal filings and social media archives.”

Here is the lawsuit filed by Attorney General Xavier Becerra.
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EVICTIONS: In the LAT, Liam Dillon reports on the actions of local governments to halt evictions before the new rent-gouging and eviction protections law (AB 1482) takes effect January 1. Dillon writes:

“In the interim, tenants across the state have been complaining that landlords are hiking their rents and issuing no-fault evictions before the law takes effect. And, in response, cities and counties have been passing emergency moratoria to stop it.

In the past six weeks, about three dozen local governments have approved rules to prevent evictions, according to a tally by Tenants Together, a renter advocacy group.”

PG&E: J.D. Morris and Carolyn Said write for the Chron that during the recent public safety power shutoffs, some customers were not affected as the utility experiments with the often-cited solution of “microgrids.”

Microgrids are local generation and storage and are seen as one of the best ways to prevent electricity-caused wildfires, as they can be segmented off the main grid.

FROM THE DESK OF THE DEAN: George Skelton writes in the LA Times that Democrats handed Republicans a victory by pushing through the Trump tax returns bill, which has been sideline by the courts. Skelton writes:

“The Legislature didn’t even consider the state Constitution, the court noted. A 1972 constitutional amendment approved by voters clearly made the primary ballot accessible to all “recognized” presidential candidates.

The Democrats’ law also violated the U.S. Constitution, a federal judge ruled earlier. For one thing, it conflicted with the qualifications clause in Article 2, which states that a president simply must be a natural born citizen who has lived in the country 14 years and be at least 35. Nothing about releasing tax returns.

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla, a Democrat, filed an appeal, but dropped it after the state court ruled against the law.”

BLOOMBERG: Shane Goldmacher tweets that Angelenos are likely to see a lot of presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg during the evenings.

BART: In the Chron, Rachel Swan reports that after a stabbing aboard a BART train, new concerns about the safety of the transportation system are being raised.

CONCEALED CARRY: The Merc News’s Robert Salonga and Thy Vo report on the concealed carry permit scandal in Santa Clara County. They write “The Santa Clara County sheriff’s system for granting concealed weapons permits is so inconsistent — and the record-keeping so fragmented — that it is difficult to discern any public-safety rationale behind a process the District Attorney’s Office is investigating over allegations of political favoritism.”

SACTOWN: Marcos Bretón profiles longtime Capitol figure and Sac councilman Eric Guerra. Bretón writes:

“Nearly a quarter century before he was elected to the Sacramento City Council, Eric Guerra was 4 years old when he was smuggled from Mexico into this country without U.S. government permission. This was an act of desperation by Guerra’s parents, Zeferino and Amparo, who fled the adobe house where Guerra was born in Mexico’s interior state of Michoacan.

Before Guerra would become a star student at Sacramento State, an honors graduate with degrees in electrical and electronic engineering, and a master’s in Public Policy and Administration, he was essentially a child fugitive. More succinctly, Guerra was a refugee. He was economically displaced and politically powerless when his family finally landed in the Yolo County town of Esparto.”